Bystander-induced Apoptosis and Premature Differentiation in Primary Urothelial Explants after Charged Particle Microbeam Irradiation Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The ureter primary explant technique was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where stem and differentiated cells are present. Irradiation was performed with a 3He2+ charged particle microbeam available at the Gray Cancer Institute, with high (approximately 2 microns) precision. Tissue sections from porcine ureters were pre-irradiated with the microbeam at a single location with 10 3He2+ particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV.micron-1). After irradiation, the tissue section was incubated for 7 days, thus allowing the explant outgrowth to form. Total cellular damage (total fraction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells) was measured according to morphological criteria. Apoptosis was also assessed using a 3'-OH DNA end-labelling technique. Premature differentiation was estimated using antibodies to uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Results of our experiments demonstrated a significant bystander-induced differentiation and a less significant increase in apoptotic and micronucleated cells. A hypothesis based on the protective nature of the bystander effect is proposed.

publication date

  • June 1, 2002