Consequences of Paternal Nutrition on Offspring Health and Disease Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • It is well established that the maternal diet during the periconceptional period affects the progeny’s health. A growing body of evidence suggests that the paternal diet also influences disease onset in offspring. For many years, sperm was considered only to contribute half of the progeny’s genome. It now appears that it also plays a crucial role in health and disease in offspring’s adult life. The nutritional status and environmental exposure of fathers during their childhood and/or the periconceptional period have significant transgenerational consequences. This review aims to describe the effects of various human and rodent paternal feeding patterns on progeny’s metabolism and health, including fasting or intermittent fasting, low-protein and folic acid deficient food, and overnutrition in high-fat and high-sugar diets. The impact on pregnancy outcome, metabolic pathways, and chronic disease onset will be described. The biological and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the transmission from fathers to their progeny will be discussed. All these data provide evidence of the impact of paternal nutrition on progeny health which could lead to preventive diet recommendations for future fathers.

publication date

  • August 17, 2021

has subject area