Dysregulated resting state functional connectivity and obesity: A systematic review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Obesity has been variously linked to differences in brain functional connectivity in regions associated with reward, emotional regulation and cognition, potentially revealing neural mechanisms contributing to its development and maintenance. This systematic review summarizes and critically appraises the existing literature on differences in resting state functional connectivity (Rs-FC) between overweight and individuals with obesity in relation healthy-BMI controls. Twenty-nine studies were identified and the results consistently support the hypothesis that obesity is associated with differences in Rs-FC. Specifically, obesity/overweight was consistently associated with (i) DMN hypoconnectivity and salience network hyperconnectivity; (ii) increased Rs-FC between the hypothalamus and reward, limbic and salience networks, and decreased Rs-FC between the hypothalamus and cognitive regions; (iii) increased power within regions associated with inhibition/emotional reasoning; (iv) decreased nodal efficiency, degree centrality, and global efficiency. Collectively, the results suggest obesity is associated with disrupted connectivity of brain networks responsible for cognition, reward, self-referential processing and emotional regulation.

publication date

  • December 2021