The prognostic significance of grade of ischemia in the ECG in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: A substudy of the randomized trial of primary PCI with or without routine manual thrombectomy (TOTAL trial) Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Background

    The importance of the grade of ischemia (GI) ECG classification in the risk assessment of patients with STEMI has been shown previously. Grade 3 ischemia (G3I) is defined as ST-elevation with distortion of the terminal portion of the QRS complex in two or more adjacent leads, while Grade 2 ischemia (G2I) is defined as ST-elevation without QRS distortion. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the GI classification on the outcome in patients with STEMI.

    Methods

    7,211 patients from the TOTAL trial were included in our study. The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), cardiogenic shock, or New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure within one year.

    Results

    The primary outcome occurred in 153 of 1,563 patients (9.8%) in the G3I group vs. 364 of 5,648 patients (6.4%) in the G2I group (adjusted HR 1.27; 95% CI, 1.04 - 1.55; p=0.022). The rate of cardiovascular death (4.8% vs. 2.5%; adjusted HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.09 - 2.00; p=0.013) was also higher in patients with G3I.

    Conclusions

    G3I in the presenting ECG was associated with an increased rate of the composite of cardiovascular death, recurrent MI, cardiogenic shock, or NYHA class IV heart failure within one year compared to patients with G2I. Patients with G3I also had a higher cardiovascular death compared to patients with G2I.

authors

  • Leivo, Joonas
  • Anttonen, Eero
  • Jolly, Sanjit
  • Dzavik, Vladimir
  • Koivumäki, Jyri
  • Tahvanainen, Minna
  • Koivula, Kimmo
  • Nikus, Kjell
  • Wang, Jia
  • Cairns, John A
  • Niemelä, Kari
  • Eskola, Markku

publication date

  • September 2021