Findings from the Series of Workshops “In Whose Backyard?—Exploring Toxic Legacies in Mi'kmaw and African Nova Scotian Communities” Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Currently, Mi'kmaw (Aboriginal) and African Nova Scotian communities throughout Nova Scotia, Canada experience disproportional effects of climate change, water contamination, waste disposition, and pollution from the nearby industries. Environmental health equity research findings show differential impacts of toxic facilities and other environmental hazards on health based on race and income. This results in significantly greater health risks for these communities relative to other communities that live in less exposed areas. The Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health (ENRICH) project was borne out of an interest in addressing the concerns that Mi'kmaw and African Nova Scotian communities share about the health effects of living near to toxic facilities and other environmental hazards. A series of workshops was held throughout Nova Scotia from September 2013 to January 2014 to discuss these concerns. The main purpose of these workshops was to identify residents' main concerns about the health effects associated with their proximity to toxic facilities and other environmental hazards and to obtain their suggestions for how a future research study could support advocacy efforts around environmental injustices in their communities. The workshop sessions included topics on past, current, and future advocacy efforts and community-based participatory action research. Outcomes from the workshops include consultations with key government departments, a workshop report, a documentary film, as well as communication resources for mobilizing the wider community, such as a project newsletter, a project website, Facebook, television, newspapers, radio, and community meetings.

publication date

  • April 2015