Delay discounting and neurocognitive performance in young adults with differential patterns of substance use: Findings from the Human Connectome Project. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A large proportion of individuals who use psychoactive substances regularly use more than one substance. This pattern of behavior, termed polysubstance use, is associated with greater risks than when consuming only a single substance. The present study examined delay discounting, neurocognitive functioning, and demographic indicators among a large, racially and socioeconomically diverse sample of young adults drawn from the Human Connectome Project who reported either non, mono, or dual use of alcohol, tobacco, and/or cannabis. Univariate and multivariate tests suggested individuals who reported using multiple substances were more likely to be male, experienced higher rates of alcohol use disorder, and, when reporting both alcohol use and cannabis involvement, scored lower on a measure of inhibitory control relative to those who reported mono or dual use of alcohol and/or cigarettes. Individuals who reported currently smoking cigarettes exhibited the steepest discounting irrespective of other substances used; however, we observed additive effects for alcohol use and, to a lesser extent, cannabis involvement. Specifically, steeper discounting occurred when individuals who reported either regular alcohol use or > 100 lifetime instances of cannabis use also reported smoking cigarettes. We discuss several hypotheses for this finding related to the diversity of the sample and substances assessed as well as directions for future programmatic lines of research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

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publication date

  • June 3, 2021