A cuboid chromatography device having short bed-height gives better protein separation at a significantly lower pressure drop than a taller column having the same bed-volume Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Simultaneously reducing the bed-height and increasing the area of cross-section, while keeping the bed-volume the same, would substantially reduce the pressure drop across a process chromatography column. This would minimize problems such as resin compaction and non-uniformity in column packing, which are commonly faced when using soft chromatographic media. However, the increase in macroscale convective dispersion due to the increase in column diameter, and the resultant loss in resolution would far outweigh any potential benefit. Cuboid-packed bed devices have lower macroscale convective dispersion compared to their equivalent cylindrical columns. In this paper, we discuss how and why a flat cuboid chromatography device having a short bed-height gives better protein separation, at a significantly lower pressure drop, than a taller column having the same bed-volume. First, we explored this option based on computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. Depending on the flow rate, the pressure drop across the flat cuboid device was lower than that in the tall column by a factor of 6.35 to 6.4 (i.e. less than 1/6th the pressure). The CFD results also confirmed that the macroscale convective dispersion within the flat cuboid device was significantly lower. Head-to-head separation experiments using a 1 mL flat cuboid device having a bed-height of 10 mm, and a 1 mL tall column having a bed-height of 25.8 mm, both packed with the same chromatographic media, were carried out. The number of theoretical plates per unit bed-height was on an average, around 2.5 time times greater with the flat cuboid device, while the total number of theoretical plates in the two devices were comparable. At any given superficial velocity, the height equivalent of a theoretical plate in the tall column was on an average, higher by a factor 2.5. Binary protein separation experiments showed that at any given flow rate, the resolution obtained using the flat cuboid device was significantly higher than that obtained with the tall column. This work opens up the possibility of designing and developing short bed-height chromatography devices for carrying out high-resolution biopharmaceutical purifications, at very low pressures.

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publication date

  • June 2021