Does curve magnitude in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) affect frequency and quality of sport participation? A feasibility study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Abstract Background This pilot study explores whether large adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) curves (≥ 45°) lead to decreased frequency and quality of sport participation, lower health-related quality of life (HRQL), and more pronounced shortness of breath (SOB) as compared to smaller curvatures (< 45°). Methods Patients were divided into two groups based on their spinal curvature: Cobb angle < 45° (n = 31) and ≥ 45° (n = 21). We assessed feasibility outcomes including agreement to be approached, participation, recruitment rates and missing data. All participants completed five questionnaires to assess the frequency and quality of sport participation, HRQL and SOB outcomes. Estimates of effects 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Results This study enrolled 52 surgically untreated AIS patients between the ages of 10 and 18 (44 females, 8 males, mean age = 14.60). All feasibility threshold criteria were successfully met (100% agreement to be approached, 100% participation with n ≥ 12 in each group, and 94.2% of patients without missing data). AIS patients with large curvatures (≥ 45°) trended towards decreased frequency and quality of sport participation, more pronounced SOB and worse HRQL outcomes, as compared to patients with smaller curve sizes. Conclusion The study findings show that a study addressing sport participation in the setting of AIS is feasible. The size of curvature in AIS may have an impact on sport participation, HRQL and SOB, but larger studies are required.

publication date

  • December 2021