Transition from pediatric to adult follow-up care in childhood cancer survivors—a systematic review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: The successful transition of childhood cancer survivors from pediatric- to adult-focused long-term follow-up care is crucial and can be a critical period. Knowledge of current transition practices, especially regarding barriers and facilitators perceived by survivors and health care professionals, is important to develop sustainable transition processes and implement them into daily clinical practice. We performed a systematic review with the aim of assessing transition practices, readiness tools, and barriers and facilitators. METHODS: We searched three databases (PubMed, Embase/Ovid, CINAHL) and included studies published between January 2000 and January 2020. We performed this review according to the PRISMA guidelines and registered the study protocol on PROSPERO; two reviewers independently extracted the content of the included studies. RESULTS: We included 26 studies: six studies described current transition practices, six assessed transition readiness tools, and 15 assessed barriers and facilitators to transition. CONCLUSION: The current literature describing transition practices is limited and overlooks adherence to follow-up care as a surrogate marker of transition success. However, the literature provides deep insight into barriers and facilitators to transition and theoretical considerations for the assessment of transition readiness. We showed that knowledge and education are key facilitators to transition that should be integrated into transition practices tailored to the individual needs of each survivor and the possibilities and limitations of each country's health care system. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: The current knowledge on barriers and facilitators on transition should be implemented in clinical practice to support sustainable transition processes.

publication date

  • February 2021