Compaction and control—the role of chromosome-organizing proteins in Streptomyces Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • ABSTRACT Chromosomes are dynamic entities, whose organization and structure depend on the concerted activity of DNA-binding proteins and DNA-processing enzymes. In bacteria, chromosome replication, segregation, compaction and transcription are all occurring simultaneously, and to ensure that these processes are appropriately coordinated, all bacteria employ a mix of well-conserved and species-specific proteins. Unusually, Streptomyces bacteria have large, linear chromosomes and life cycle stages that include multigenomic filamentous hyphae and unigenomic spores. Moreover, their prolific secondary metabolism yields a wealth of bioactive natural products. These different life cycle stages are associated with profound changes in nucleoid structure and chromosome compaction, and require distinct repertoires of architectural—and regulatory—proteins. To date, chromosome organization is best understood during Streptomyces sporulation, when chromosome segregation and condensation are most evident, and these processes are coordinated with synchronous rounds of cell division. Advances are, however, now being made in understanding how chromosome organization is achieved in multigenomic hyphal compartments, in defining the functional and regulatory interplay between different architectural elements, and in appreciating the transcriptional control exerted by these ‘structural’ proteins.

publication date

  • November 24, 2020