Measurement properties of preference-based measures for economic evaluation in COPD: a systematic review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: Preference-based measures can provide measurements of health-related quality of life and be utilized for cost-effectiveness analyses of interventions in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether generic preference-based measures are reliable, valid, and responsive in COPD. METHODS: A systematic review was performed using the Consensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) guidelines. Three databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Studies were included if the sample represented individuals with COPD and the aim was to evaluate one or more psychometric properties or the interpretability of generic preference-based measures. RESULTS: Six hundred and sixty-seven abstracts were screened, 65 full-text articles were reviewed and 24 articles met the inclusion criteria. Measures which emerged from the search were the EQ-5D, the SF-6D, the Quality of Well-being scale, the 15D, and the Health Utilities Index 3. Evidence for the test-retest reliability of these measures was limited. Construct validity of the measures was well supported with correlations with generic health profiles being 0.37-0.68, and correlations with COPD-specific health profiles being 0.53-0.75. Evidence for known-groups validity of these measures was poor and data on responsiveness were mixed. CONCLUSION: Generic preference-based measures' sensitivity to change and ability to discriminate between different disease severities in COPD was poorly supported. Future research may consider examining the development of COPD-specific preference-based measures that may allow for a more accurate detection of change and discrimination among disease severities to facilitate cost-effectiveness evaluations.

publication date

  • November 2020