Differential expression of cathepsins B and D in testis and epididymis of adult rats. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Cathepsins are specific proteases in lysosomes that participate in the degradation of proteins, some of which are derived from endocytosis. In this study we examined the immunocytochemical localization of cathepsin B and D antibodies in cells of rat testis and epididymis, using light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. In testis, cathepsin D was immunolocalized over lysosomes of Sertoli cells and Leydig cells and on the acrosome of spermatids. Cathepsin B was found over lysosomes of macrophages. Non-ciliated cells of the efferent ducts revealed intense immunogold labeling over lysosomes with both anti-cathepsin B and D antibodies. In epididymis, cathepsins B and D showed marked variations in expression over the different epithelial cells and regional differences for a given cell type. Anti-cathepsin D antibodies showed intense labeling over lysosomes of principal cells in the corpus and proximal cauda. In contrast, anti-cathepsin B antibodies revealed intensely labeled lysosomes of principal cells of the distal initial segment, intermediate zone, and caput epididymidis, with weaker labeling in other regions. Clear cells of the proximal caput epididymidis revealed intensely labeled lysosomes for anti-cathepsin D antibodies. In the distal caput, clear cells showed a variable reaction pattern from intensely labeled to unreactive. Basal cells of teh intermediate zone and proximal caput region were intensely reactive for anti-cathepsin D antibodies. There was no staining over clear or basal cells with anti-cathepsin B antibodies. Taken together, these results demonstrate cell-specific and regional differences in the distribution of cathepsins B and D in cells of the male reproductive system. Such results suggest substrate specificity with regard to protein turnover within lysosomes of cells of testis and epididymis.

publication date

  • May 1995