On increasing wet-web strength with adhesive polymers Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Fiber-fiber adhesion, called “bonding” in the old paper physics literature, is a critical component of the overall strength of dry paper. With freshly formed very wet pulp fiber webs, all evidence suggests there are no fiber-fiber crossings with significant adhesive joint strength. With water removal, a point will be reached where fiber-fiber adhesion starts to contribute to the overall wet-web strength. The literature reveals very few examples of polymers that increase fiber-fiber joint strength in freshly formed webs. Here, we summarize the literature and explain why it is so difficult to promote fiber-fiber wet adhesion with polymers. Nevertheless, ongoing research in areas as diverse as tissue engineering scaffolds and biomimetic adhe-sives gives clues to future developments. Advances in paper machine engineering have lessened the importance of wet-web strength. By contrast, a critical issue in many of the evolving nanocellulose technologies is the strength of objects first formed by aqueous processing, the green strength—the strength of wet bodies before drying. For exam-ple, 3-D printed nanocellulose objects and ultralow density cellulosic aerogels can be destroyed by capillary forces during drying. There is a need for adhesives that strengthen freshly formed, wet lignocellulosic joints.

publication date

  • February 1, 2020