Knowledge translation strategies to support service providers’ implementation of the “F-words in Childhood Disability” Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Purpose: Service providers are adopting the "F-words" in practice as a strengths-based approach to childhood disability. This study aimed to gain insight into service providers' uses of the "F-words", associated barriers, and knowledge translation strategies needed to support implementation.Methods: Service providers were invited to participate in an interview after completing an online survey on their clinical implementation of the "F-words". Content analysis provided insight into use of the "F-words" and perceived barriers; and to identify knowledge translation strategies to facilitate implementation.Results: Twenty-one service providers from nine countries participated in interviews. Applications of the "F-words" included its use as a conceptual framework, directly in practice, and in teaching/training. Barriers included conflicting attitudes, insufficient funding, language, and misalignment with organizational/government priorities. To support the adoption of the "F-words", participants recommended knowledge translation strategies including local opinion leaders, linkage and exchange, educational outreach and meetings, and distribution of educational materials.Conclusions: Understanding uses, barriers to use, and knowledge translation strategies will inform future directions to move the "F-words" into practice. A critical step in bridging the research-to-practice gap and encouraging more widespread adoption requires collaboration with service providers to tailor knowledge translation strategies to fit the local context.Implications for RehabilitationService providers around the world are interested in the ICF-based "F-words" and are adopting them in clinical practice to support a holistic, strengths-based approach to childhood disability.While there is considerable uptake of the "F-words", service providers have experienced barriers including conflicting attitudes of families and colleagues, insufficient funding, lack of translations, and misalignment with organizational and government priorities.To further support implementation and overcome perceived barriers, service providers recommended using four knowledge translation strategies: (i) local opinion leaders; (ii) linkage and exchange; (iii) educational outreach/meetings; and (iv) the distribution of educational materials.Service providers and researchers must partner together to tailor knowledge translation strategies to the local context in order to address the needs and priorities of service providers' specific settings and bridge the gap between research evidence and practice.

publication date

  • February 28, 2020