Using Two-Eyed Seeing in Research With Indigenous People: An Integrative Review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Background: The Two-Eyed Seeing approach has been advocated for use in research with Indigenous people as it creates a space for Western and Indigenous ways of knowing to come together using the best of both worldviews to aid understanding and solve problems. Foundational literature presents its use as a promising way to promote ethical exchanges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, but the practical application of its concepts to research remains vague. Method: This integrative review, using the Whittemore and Knafl approach, describes the state of the literature pertaining to the interpretation and application of Two-Eyed Seeing. Following a search of the literature, 37 articles were selected for inclusion, and primary studies ( n = 11) were critiqued for quality. Data were extracted, analyzed, and synthesized into themes. Results: Three themes were compiled from the literature including (a) defining characteristics of Two-Eyed Seeing, (b) suggested attributes of those engaging with Two-Eyed Seeing, and (c) the application of Two-Eyed Seeing in research. Conclusions: This review demonstrates inconsistencies in how to date researchers have interpreted and applied Two-Eyed Seeing in research with Indigenous people. The collection of key attributes of researchers and application procedures to research discussed in this review present a new standard for the application of Two-Eyed Seeing to research with Indigenous people. Researchers using Two-Eyed Seeing should thoroughly describe their application of its concepts to promote its maturation into a well-defined framework for research with Indigenous people.

publication date

  • January 2019