Specificity of Acyl Chain Composition of Phosphatidylinositols Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Phosphatidylinositol (PI) lipids have a predominance of a single molecular species present through the organism. In healthy mammals this molecular species is 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl (18:0/20:4) PI. Although the importance of PI lipids for cell physiology has long been appreciated, less is known about the biological role of enriching PI lipids with 18:0/20:4 acyl chains. In conditions with dysfunctional lipid metabolism, the predominance of 18:0/20:4 acyl chains is lost. Recently, molecular mechanisms underpinning the enrichment or alteration of these acyl chains in PI lipids have begun to emerge. In the majority of the cases a common feature is the presence of enzymes bearing substrate acyl chain specificity. However, in cancer cells, it has been shown that one (not the only) of the mechanisms responsible for the loss in this acyl chain enrichment is mutation on the transcription factor p53 gene, which is one of the most highly mutated genes in cancers. There is a compelling need for a global picture of the specificity of the acyl chain composition of PIs. This can be possible once high-resolution spatio-temporal information is gathered in a cellular context; which can ultimately lead to potential novel targets to combat conditions with altered PI acyl chain profiles.

publication date

  • September 2019