Preadult Stage Parasites and Multiple Timed Exposure to Infective Larvae Are Involved in Development of Limb Edema in Brugia malayi-Infected Indian Leaf Monkeys (Presbytis entellus) Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • ABSTRACT The pathogenesis of filarial limb edema is not known. The role of parasitological variables and parasite-mediated phenomena in the development of limb edema was investigated in the Presbytis entellus-Brugia malayi model. Infection was initiated with subcutaneous inoculation of infective third-stage larvae (L3), and the animals were reexposed to different doses of L3 at the prepatent, patent, and diminishing microfilaremia (0 to 5% of peak microfilaremia count) stages of infection. A large L3 inoculum size and repeated inoculation in the ankle region during the prepatent, patent, and diminishing microfilaremia stages of infection were found to be necessary for reproducible induction of limb edema. The preadult stage of the parasite was found to be the most potent inducer of limb edema, followed by L5 and L4. The presence of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in edema fluid in the leg receiving the parasite challenge indicated that the limb edema development was due to parasite-mediated cytokine responses. The absence of bacterial infection or anti-streptolysin O titer in the edema fluid and blood indicated that bacterial infection is not necessary for the development of limb edema.

publication date

  • July 2002