Complement and macrophage crosstalk during process of angiogenesis in tumor progression Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • The complement system, which contains some of the most potent pro-inflammatory mediators in the tissue including the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a are the vital parts of innate immunity. Complement activation seems to play a more critical role in tumor development, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance of the activated complement mediators and macrophage polarization during tumor progression. The tumor growth mainly supported by the infiltration of M2- tumor-associated macrophages, and high levels of C3a and C5a, whereas M1-macrophages contribute to immune-mediated tumor suppression. Macrophages express a cognate receptors for both C3a and C5a on their cell surface, and specific binding of C3a and C5a affects the functional modulation and angiogenic properties. Activation of complement mediators induce angiogenesis, favors an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and activate cancer-associated signaling pathways to assist chronic inflammation. In this review manuscript, we highlighted the specific roles of complement activation and macrophage polarization during uncontrolled angiogenesis in tumor progression, and therefore blocking of complement mediators would be an alternative therapeutic option for treating cancer.

publication date

  • December 2015