Riboflavin transporter deficiency mimicking mitochondrial myopathy caused by complex II deficiency Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Biallelic likely pathogenic variants in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 cause riboflavin transporter deficiency. It is characterized by muscle weakness, ataxia, progressive ponto-bulbar palsy, amyotrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss. Oral riboflavin halts disease progression and may reverse symptoms. We report two new patients whose clinical and biochemical features were mimicking mitochondrial myopathy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old male with global developmental delay, axial and appendicular hypotonia, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss. His muscle biopsy showed complex II deficiency and ragged red fibers consistent with mitochondrial myopathy. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous likely pathogenic variant in SLC52A2 (c.917G>A; p.Gly306Glu). Patient 2 is a 14-month-old boy with global developmental delay, respiratory insufficiency requiring ventilator support within the first year of life. His muscle biopsy revealed combined complex II + III deficiency and ragged red fibers consistent with mitochondrial myopathy. Whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous likely pathogenic variant in SCL52A3 (c.1223G>A; p.Gly408Asp). We report two new patients with riboflavin transporter deficiency, caused by mutations in two different riboflavin transporter genes. Both patients presented with complex II deficiency. This treatable neurometabolic disorder can mimic mitochondrial myopathy. In patients with complex II deficiency, riboflavin transporter deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis to allow early treatment and improve neurodevelopmental outcome.

authors

  • Nimmo, Graeme AM
  • Ejaz, Resham
  • Cordeiro, Dawn
  • Kannu, Peter
  • Mercimek‐Andrews, Saadet

publication date

  • February 2018

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