Preoperative gait patterns and BMI are associated with tibial component migration Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no standard for patient triage in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) based on joint functional characteristics. This is largely due to the lack of objective postoperative measurement of success in TKA in terms of function and longevity, and the lack of knowledge of preoperative metrics that influence outcome. We examined the association between the preoperative mechanical environment of the patients knee joint during gait and the post-TKA stability of the tibial component as measured with radiostereometric analysis (RSA). METHODS: 37 subjects were recruited out of a larger randomized RSA trial. 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed in the preoperative week. Longitudinal RSA data were gathered postoperatively at 6 months and 1 year. RESULTS: We found a statistically significant association between the pattern of the knee adduction moment during gait preoperatively and the total migration of the implant at 6 months postoperatively. A substantial proportion of the variability in the total postoperative tibial component migration (R(2) = 0.45) was explained by a combination of implant type, preoperative knee joint loading patterns during gait, and body mass index at 6 months postoperatively. The relationships did not remain statistically significant at 1 year postoperatively. INTERPRETATION: Our findings support the hypothesis that preoperative functional characteristics of patients, and particularly joint loading patterns during activities of daily living, are important for outcome in TKA. This represents a first step in the development of predictive models of objective TKA outcome based on preoperative patient characteristics, which may lead to better treatment strategies. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00405379).

publication date

  • August 2010