Urban First Nations Men: Narratives of Positive Identity and Implications for Culturally Safe Care Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: Dominant discourse contains negative stereotypical images of First Nations males that are steeped in colonialism. These racialized images can influence First Nations men's sense of self as well as the care that nurses deliver. The objective was to (a) explore practices that support positive First Nations identity and (b) provide suggestions for practicing culturally safe care. DESIGN: The theory of Two-Eyed Seeing guided this study. Data were collected via two semistructured interviews and Anishnaabe Symbol-Based Reflection from three First Nations men living in Toronto, Canada. FINDINGS: Having mentors, knowing family histories, and connecting with healthy Aboriginal communities fostered positive First Nations identities for participants. IMPLICATIONS: There is potential to advance nursing practice by enacting creative means that may support client's positive First Nations identity and well-being. Nursing education that focuses on strength-based and decolonizing frameworks, as well as reflexive practices that promote culturally safe care, is needed.

publication date

  • September 2017