Validation of a brief behavioral economic assessment of demand among cigarette smokers. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Basic and clinical addiction research use demand measures and analysis extensively to characterize drug use motivations. Hence, obtaining an accurate and brief measurement of demand that can be easily utilized in different settings is highly valued. In the current study, 2 versions of a breakpoint measure, designed to capture cigarette demand, were investigated in 119 smokers who were recruited from an online crowdsourcing platform. The first version determines the maximum price a smoker is willing to pay for one cigarette received right now when paid out of pocket, and the second determines the maximum price when paid using a hypothetical $100 gift card received for free. The breakpoint measures were administered along with the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), Fagerstr├Âm Test for Cigarette Dependence (FTCD), and The Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU-brief). Both single-item breakpoint versions were significantly correlated with CPT-derived demand measures loaded on the persistence factor (i.e., elasticity of demand, breakpoint, Pmax, and Omax), but not with those loaded on the amplitude factor (i.e., intensity of demand). In addition, both single-item measures were associated with metrics of tobacco dependence (e.g., FTCD, QSU) with effect sizes that are similar to the ones found between CPT-derived breakpoint and those same metrics. These findings suggest that the single-item breakpoint measure is a viable method for measuring demand that may provide a useful and efficient tool to capture crucial and distinct aspects of smoking. In addition, the breakpoint measures may help increase the utility of behavioral demand measures in novel research and clinical settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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publication date

  • February 2019