Characterization of the protein kinase activities of human platelet supernatant and particulate fractions Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • After human platelets were lysed by freezing and thawing in the presence of EDTA, about 35% of the total cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was specifically associated with the particulate fraction. In contrast, Ca2+-activated phospholipid-dependent protein kinase was found exclusively in the soluble fraction. Photoaffinity labelling of the regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with 8-azido-cyclic [32P]AMP indicated that platelet lysate contained a 4-fold excess of 49 000-Da RI subunits over 55 000-Da RII subunits. The RI and RII subunits were found almost entirely in the particulate and soluble fractions respectively. Chromatography of the soluble fraction on DEAE-cellulose demonstrated a single peak of cyclic AMP-dependent activity with the elution characteristics and regulatory subunits characteristic of the type-II enzyme. A major enzyme peak containing Ca2+-activated phospholipid-dependent protein kinase was eluted before the type-II enzyme, but no type-I cyclic AMP-dependent activity was normally observed in the soluble fraction. The particulate cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and associated RI subunits were solubilized by buffers containing 0.1 or 0.5% (w/v) Triton X-100, but not by extraction with 0.5 M-NaCl, indicating that this enzyme is firmly membrane-bound, either as an integral membrane protein or via an anchor protein. DEAE-cellulose chromatography of the Triton X-100 extracts demonstrated the presence of both type-I cyclic AMP-dependent holoenzyme and free RI subunits. These results show that platelets contain three main protein kinase activities detectable with histone substrates, namely a membrane-bound type-I cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme, a soluble type-II cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme and Ca2+-activated phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, which was soluble in lysates containing EDTA.

publication date

  • March 1, 1984