An Examination of Feedback Seeking in Individuals With Social Anxiety Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, or No History of Mental Disorder Using a Daily Diary Method Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This study examined excessive reassurance seeking (or positive feedback seeking; PFS) and negative feedback seeking (NFS) in individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), or no history of mental health difficulties. A 2-week daily diary method was used to examine potential group differences in the frequency, topics, and targets of PFS and NFS. The SAD and GAD groups reported significantly higher feedback seeking (FS) than the healthy group on self-report questionnaires. The most common targets of FS in each group were other people (e.g., romantic partner, family members). According to diary data, there were no significant group differences in the frequency of PFS, NFS, overall FS, or overall FS adjusted for self-reported compliance with diary completion (after applying Bonferroni correction). There were also no significant group differences in FS topics according to diary data. Future research directions and potential implications of these findings are discussed.

publication date

  • April 2018