High-resolution PET imaging and quantitation of pharmaceutical biodistributions in a small animal using avalanche photodiode detectors Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The feasibility of high-resolution PET using BGO-avalanche photodiode detectors for in vivo imaging and quantitation of the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals is demonstrated. A prototype PET camera consisting of two scanning arrays of eight EG&G C30994 solid-state scintillation detectors was used to simulate a 310-mm diameter dual-ring animal tomograph having a 130-mm port and three imaging slices, each about 3.5 mm thick. The spatial resolution (FWHM) is 3 mm or less, isotropic and uniform throughout the 120-mm diameter field of view. METHODS: Female Fischer 344/CRBL rats implanted with subcutaneous mammary adenocarcinoma tumors were injected with copper-tetrasulfophthalocyanine (CuPcS4), a potential sensitizer for the photodynamic therapy of cancer, labeled with 64Cu (T1/2 = 12.7 hr, beta +:19%). RESULTS: In spite of the low specific radioactivity of 64Cu and other inherent limitations, organs such as the liver, kidneys and the tumor could be resolved with sufficient detail for their separation and quantitation. Apart from the tumor, agreement was obtained between the biodistributions measured by PET and by scintillation counting. The discrepancy for the tumor measurement results from averaging the radioactivity over the entire tumor volume when, in fact, CuPcS4 does not completely penetrate the tumor. This incomplete penetration is noted on the PET images. CONCLUSIONS: PET based on avalanche photodiode detectors provides an accurate measurement of target organ and tumor tissue concentrations. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of very high resolution PET for biodistribution studies in small animals.

publication date

  • August 1994