Attitudes of Canadian oncology practitioners toward psychosocial interventions in clinical and research settings in women with breast cancer. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The aim of this study was to survey Canadian oncology practitioners' attitudes toward psychosocial concerns and issues in women with breast cancer. Surveys were mailed to 351 medical, radiation and surgical oncologists and 375 oncology nurses. Standard questionnaires assessed attitudes towards psychosocial issues in women with primary and metastatic breast cancer and evaluated the practitioners' willingness to refer women to psychosocial intervention trials in the presence and absence of competing drug trials. Responses were obtained from 74% of those surveyed. Respondents reported being aware of the common occurrence of psychosocial problems in women with metastatic breast cancer, however, physicians were less likely than nurses to offer these women psychosocial support on a prophylactic basis (p < 0.0001) and they expressed greater concern than nurses about scientific validity of (p = 0.0003), and potential psychological damage from (p = 0.005), psychosocial support groups. Nurses were more likely than physicians to favour a study investigating group psychosocial support over competing drug studies (p < or = 0.003) in the metastatic setting. Physicians were less likely than nurses to deal with weight problems prophylactically in women with primary breast cancer (p = 0.0009) and they expressed greater concern over scientific validity of psychosocial interventions addressing weight than nurses (p = 0.0008); nurses were more concerned about excessive expectations of patients regarding potential benefits of such interventions (p < 0.0001). Regardless, nurses were more likely than physicians to favour a psychosocial intervention study focused on weight management over drug studies in pre- (p = 0.0006) and postmenopausal women (p = 0.05) with primary breast cancer. Canadian oncology practitioners are aware of the common occurrence of psychosocial distress in women with breast cancer. Physicians and nurses assigned differing priorities to psychosocial interventions in both clinical and research situations.

publication date

  • September 1997

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