Investigating Youth Sport Coach Perspectives of an Asthma Education Module Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Physical activity can reduce symptoms and improve wellbeing in people who have asthma, and organized sport is one way for children and youth with asthma to engage in exercise. While asthmatic youth may experience a number of barriers to sport participation, healthy physical and social sport environments supported by coaches can help asthmatic youth athletes maintain long-term engagement in activity. This paper reports results of an assessment of an online coach education tool related to air quality, physical activity, and allergic disease (e.g., asthma). Focus groups with youth team sport coaches in southern Ontario (n=12 participants) were conducted to explore how users experience the module and short- and medium-term outcomes of implementation. Although coaches perceive the module as relevant, it is considered less valuable in certain contexts (e.g., indoor environments) or when compared with other coach education (e.g., tactical). Although broad asthma management behaviours (e.g., athlete medical forms) were recognized, specific module-identified prevention and management techniques (e.g., the Air Quality Health Index) were less frequently described. Ensuring environment and health coach education emphasizes athlete performance while reducing risk is critical to promoting module application and providing safe and enjoyable youth team sport spaces.

publication date

  • June 3, 2018