The Teaching of Psychotherapy in Canadian Psychiatric Residency Programs: Residents’ Perceptions Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • In order to determine the residents' perceptions toward their psychotherapy training, a questionnaire was distributed to 400 residents in the 16 Canadian psychiatric residency programs. The main areas studied were: the resident's demographic and educational characteristics; the residency program characteristics; the type of training available in different psychotherapeutic modalities; the analysis of quality and quantity of attention given to different elements of psychotherapy supervision (patient assessment, diagnostic formulation of treatment approach and goals); the degree of importance attributed by the residents to the above mentioned elements of psychotherapy supervision; and the residents' perception of their supervisor's attributes (examples: teaching ability and rapport). Forty-two percent of the residents completed the questionnaire. Residents mentioned that the most adequate supervision was for long-term individual psychotherapy cases and that behavioral and group therapy supervision was the least adequate. The three most essential qualities in a supervisor's profile were judged to be: capacity for the development of a good rapport with the trainee; ability to pinpoint residents' psychotherapy shortcomings and his willingness to help residents to overcome them; ability to teach. Three factors that significantly influenced the trainees perception of their psychotherapy training were: resident's age, a seminar in individual psychotherapy in the residency core program; having received more than one hour weekly of psychotherapy supervision. The understanding of patient's psychodynamics was the most adequately taught element during psychotherapy supervision.

publication date

  • December 1984