Canadian physician survey on the medical management of hereditary angioedema Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease that has significant morbidity and may be potentially fatal because of airway obstruction. OBJECTIVE: To determine practice patterns in physicians treating HAE. METHODS: A survey was designed to determine HAE practice patterns among Canadian physicians. These physicians were identified by sending the survey to members of 3 physician organizations (Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network, Canadian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, and Canadian Hematology Society). RESULTS: Thirty-six physicians responded to the survey. Thirty-four physicians were included in the analysis. Most referrals to HAE-treating physicians were from family and emergency department physicians. The most common sites of swelling reported by patients to physicians were facial, peripheral, and abdominal. A mean of 53.9% of patients with type 1 and 2 HAE and 53.4% of patients with HAE with normal C1 esterase inhibitor were undergoing long-term prophylaxis. A mean of 41.9%, 19.4%, and 93.5% of respondents had some patients taking danazol, tranexamic acid, and C1-esterase inhibitor, respectively. Most physicians believed that severity and frequency of attacks were the most important determinants in deciding when to use prophylaxis. A mean of 88.2% of physicians used C1-esterase inhibitor to treat acute attacks and 79.4% used icatibant. All respondents were aware of HAE guidelines. CONCLUSION: Physicians are using guidelines to support their practice and using agents suggested by guidelines with confidence. C1 inhibitor is being used widely for prophylaxis and treatment of acute attacks along with icatibant. However, certain special patient populations may require additional focus in future guidelines.

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publication date

  • November 2018