Topical ointment for preventing infection in preterm infants Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: This section is under preparation and will be included in the next issue. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of prophylactic application of emollient ointment in preterm infants. SEARCH STRATEGY: Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Medline (MeSH terms: ointment; limits: age groups, newborn infant; publication types, clinical trial), previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conference and symposia proceedings, expert informants, and journal handsearching in the English language. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials which compared the effect of prophylactic application of emollient ointment to routine care or as needed topical therapy in preterm infants are included in this review. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data regarding clinical outcomes including transepidermal water loss, skin condition, fluid intake, suspect infection and proven nosocomial infection were excerpted from the reports of the clinical trials by the reviewers. Data analysis was done in accordance with the standards of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. MAIN RESULTS: Two randomized trials which compared prophylactic application of ointment to routine skin care or as needed topical ointment therapy were identified. Lane (1993) noted improved skin condition in infants receiving topical application of emollient ointment. In the study of Nopper and coworkers (1996), prophylactic application of ointment significantly decreased transepidermal water loss during the first six hours after initial application. Skin condition was noted to be improved during the first 1-2 weeks. Surveillance cultures demonstrated less bacterial colonization during the two week study. A significant decrease in suspect and proven infection was noted. Fewer infants were evaluated for sepsis among the group who received prophylactic application of ointment (relative risk 0. 50, 95% CI 0.27, 0.93; risk difference -0.30, 95% CI -0.54, -0.06). Both studies reported on the incidence of proven nosocomial infection. A trend towards a decrease in the risk of proven nosocomial infection was noted in infants who received prophylactic application of emollient ointment (typical relative risk 0.29, 95% CI 0.07, 1.16, typical risk difference -0.13, 95% CI -0.25, -0.01). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: In two small studies, prophylactic application of emollient ointment decreased transepidermal water loss, decreased the severity of dermatitis, and decreased the risk of suspect sepsis and proven sepsis. Further clinical studies are warranted to validate these results.

publication date

  • 2000