Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans. Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of [35S] sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the 35S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The cell-associated 35S-labeled proteoglycans were extracted from the MMC-enriched cell preparation by the addition of detergent and 4 M guanidine HCl and were partially purified by density gradient centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approximately 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography of chondroitinase ABC-treated 35S-labeled proteoglycans from these rat MMC revealed that the chondroitin sulfate chains consisted predominantly of disaccharides with the disulfated di-B structure (IdUA-2SO4----GalNAc-4SO4) and disaccharides with the monosulfated A structure (G1cUA----GalNAc-4SO4). The ratio of disaccharides of the di-B to A structure ranged from 0.4 to 1.6 in three experiments. Small amounts of chondroitin sulfate E disaccharides (GlcUA----GalNAc-4,6-diSO4) were also detected in the chondroitinase ABC digests of the purified rat MMC proteoglycans, but no nitrous acid-susceptible heparin/heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans were detected. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain such a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched population of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leukemia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans as well as rat serosal mast cell heparin proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

publication date

  • July 1, 1986