A role for isotype-specific binding factors in the regulation of IgA- and IgG-specific responses by the anti/contrasuppressor T cell circuit. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Previous studies have shown that the isotype of an antibody response is selected, in part, by the inhibition of isotype-specific suppression. The antisuppressor model predicts that isotype selection is initiated through an interaction between Ag, Ig, and a T cell-derived factor within 6 h of immunization. This report characterizes some of these molecules and their contribution to isotype regulation. Cultures of murine spleen cells stimulated with the T cell-dependent Ag SRBC led to Ag-specific IgG and IgA responses that could be suppressed and then antisuppressed by a molecular complex produced by mixing purified serum Ig with the supernatant of Ag-pulsed macrophages co-cultured with T cells. The supernatants from separate cultures of Ag-pulsed macrophages and rIL-1 alpha stimulated CD4+ T cells, could be pooled and mixed with Ig to produce functional antisuppressive complexes thereby allowing the factors from the different cell types to be studied separately. Adsorption of the co-culture or the rIL-1 alpha stimulated T cell supernatants against monoclonal IgG or IgA, removed IgG and IgA binding factors, respectively, and abrogated the ability to enhance the corresponding isotype. The adherent material could be recovered and used to reconstitute enhancement by the supernatants depleted of the binding factors. When affinity purified IgG or IgA was used as the source of Ig within the antisuppressive complexes, the enhancement of the antibody response was limited to the isotype of the regulatory Ig used to form the complex. Thus, manipulation of the antisuppressive molecules has a predictable effect on isotype selection. Release of isotype-specific binding factors by CD4+ cells by rIL-1 alpha supports the hypothesis that T cell circuits play a role in initiating isotype regulation.

publication date

  • September 1, 1989

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