Amphipathic peptide affects the lateral domain organization of lipid bilayers Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Using lipid-specific fluorescent probes, we studied the effects of amphipathic helical, membrane active peptides of the A- and L-type on membrane domain organization. In zwitterionic binary systems composed of mixtures of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, both types of peptides associated with the fluid phase. While binding with high affinity to fluid membranes, peptides were unable to penetrate into the lipid membrane in the gel state. If trapped kinetically by cooling from the fluid phase, peptides dissociated from the gel membrane on the time scale of several hours. While the geometrical shape of the alpha-helical peptides determines their interactions with membranes with non-bilayer phase propensity, the shape complementarity mechanism by itself is unable to induce lateral phase separation in a fluid membrane. Charge-charge interactions are capable of inducing lateral domain formation in fluid membranes. Both peptides had affinity for anionic lipids which resulted in about 30% enrichment of acidic lipids within several nanometers of the peptide's tryptophan, but there was no long-range order in peptide-induced lipid demixing. Peptide insertion in fluid acidic membranes was accompanied by only a small increase in bilayer surface and a decrease in polarity in the membrane core. Peptide-lipid charge-charge interactions were also capable of modulating existing domain composition in the course of the main phase transition in mixtures of anionic phosphatidylglycerol with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine.

publication date

  • September 1997

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