Functional studies of cochleate assemblies of an oligo-acyl-lysyl with lipid mixtures for combating bacterial multidrug resistance Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The cationic antimicrobial oligo-acyl-lysyls (OAKs) interact with lipid mixtures mimicking the composition of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes. We have reported the ability of one such OAK, C(12)K-7α(8), to cluster anionic lipids and to promote a structural change with lipid bilayers to form rolled cylindrical structures or cochleates, without requiring divalent cations for their assembly. These assemblies can be exploited for drug delivery, permitting their synergistic use with antibiotics in systemic therapy to increase efficacy and reduce toxicity. Our previous studies of the biophysical properties of these systems led us to select mixtures with the goal of optimizing their potential for enhancing effectiveness in combating bacterial multidrug resistance. Here, we further investigate the properties of such mixtures that result in enhanced in vivo activity. The role of erythromycin in the assembly of cochleates with OAK in the gel and the liquid crystalline states were assessed, as well as the encapsulation efficiency of the systems chosen. In addition, we found that erythromycin did not undermine the ability of OAKs to induce fusion of vesicles, fusion being an essential component of cochleate formation. The in vivo activity of the new assemblies tested resulted in higher survival rates of animals infected with multidrug resistant bacteria.

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publication date

  • October 2011

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