Specificity of Membrane Binding of the Neuronal Protein NAP-22 Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • NAP-22, a major protein of neuronal rafts is known to preferentially bind to membranes containing cholesterol. In this work we establish the requirements for membrane binding of NAP-22. We find that other sterols can replace cholesterol to promote binding. In addition, bilayers containing phosphatidylethanolamine bind NAP-22 in the absence of cholesterol. Thus, there is not a specific interaction of NAP-22 with cholesterol that determines its binding to membranes. Addition of a mol fraction of phosphatidylserine of 0.05 to membranes of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol enhances the membrane binding of NAP-22. The dependence of binding on the mol fraction of phosphatidylserine indicates that NAP-22 binds to membranes with its amino-terminal segment closer to the membrane than the remainder of the protein. We have also determined which segments of NAP-22 are required for membrane binding. A non-myristoylated form binds only weakly to membranes. Truncating the protein from 226 amino acids to the myristoylated aminoterminal 60 amino acids does not prevent binding to membranes in a cholesterol-dependent manner, but this binding is of weaker affinity. However, myristoylation is not sufficient to promote binding to cholesterol-rich domains. An N-terminal 19-amino-acid, myristoylated peptide binds to membranes but without requiring specific lipids. Thus, the remainder of the protein contributes to the lipid specificity of the membrane binding of NAP-22.

publication date

  • June 1, 2003

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