Stability of Thawed Apheresis Fresh-Frozen Plasma Stored for up to 120 Hours at 1°C to 6°C Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Regulations concerning the storage of transfusable plasma differ internationally. In Canada, plasma obtained from whole blood donations and frozen within 24 hours of phlebotomy (frozen plasma, FP) may be thawed and transfused within 120 hours of refrigerated storage. However, plasma frozen within 8 hours of phlebotomy following apheresis donation (FFPA) must be transfused within 24 hours of thawing and refrigeration. Our objectives were to measure coagulation factors (F) V, VII, and VIII, fibrinogen activities, and the prothrombin time (PT) in thawed refrigerated FFPA at 0, 24, and 120 hours of storage and to compare these values to those in thawed refrigerated FP. Fibrinogen activity remained unchanged over time, while mean factor levels in 28 FFPA units declined by 17% (FV), 19.7% (FVII), and 54.6% (FVIII) over 120 hours, while PT values rose to 7.6%. Factor activities were significantly higher in FFPA than FP after 120 hours of refrigerated storage. Residual FVIII activities in thawed FFPA met predefined noninferiority criteria compared to thawed FP after 120 hours. These results support a change in Canadian regulations to permit transfusion of thawed FFPA made in a closed system and refrigerated for up to 120 hours, one that could reduce wastage of transfusable plasma.

publication date

  • November 24, 2016