Evaluating complication rates and outcomes among infants less than 5 kg undergoing traditional percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion: A retrospective chart review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) enables enteral nutrition for patients with inadequate oral intake. Laparoscopic guidance of PEG insertion is used for high-risk populations, including in infants less than 5kg at insertion. This study aimed to assess complication rates with traditional PEG tube insertion in infants less than 5kg at a single tertiary care center. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients less than 5kg who underwent PEG insertion was conducted. PEG insertion-related complications, up to four years following insertion, were collected. Outcomes were reported as counts and percentages, or median with minimum and maximum values. RESULTS: 480 pediatric gastrostomy procedures between January 1, 2009 and February 1, 2017, were screened, with 129 included for analysis. Median weight at PEG insertion was 3800g. Superficial surgical site infection (SSI) occurred in 6 (4.7%) patients, and 1 (0.8%) required readmission for intravenous antibiotics. One (0.8%) required endoscopic management for retained foreign body, 1 (0.8%) required operative management for gastrocolic fistula, and 1 (0.8%) for persistent gastrocutaneous fistula. No deep space SSI, procedure-related hemorrhage requiring readmission or transfusion, buried bumper syndrome, or procedure-related mortality occurred. CONCLUSION: Traditional PEG tube insertion in infants less than 5kg results in complication rates comparable to pediatric literature standards. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, retrospective prognosis study.

publication date

  • May 2018