Replacing gastrostomy tubes with collapsible bumpers in pediatric patients: Is it safe to “cut” the tube and allow the bumper to pass enterally? Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: The "cut and push" technique for removal of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes with collapsible bumpers offers an alternative to the standard traction method of removal. This study compared the outcomes of these techniques. METHODS: We completed a research ethics board-approved retrospective cohort study, identifying all patients less than 18years of age who underwent PEG tube removal at a children's hospital between December 2013 and December 2016. Outcomes included need for sedation and complications. RESULTS: We identified 127 children who had PEG tubes removed. Significantly fewer children required sedation with the cut and push group (1.1% vs. 60.6%, p≤0.001). Ten complications occurred, including 9 in the cut and push group (9.6% vs. 3%, p=0.23). Mean age at time of complication was significantly younger in the cut and push group (2.2 vs. 6.3years p=0.004). CONCLUSION: This is the largest reported series comparing the cut and push vs. traction removal methods. The cut and push technique significantly reduced the need for procedural sedation but was associated with increased risk of complications. While these data suggest that the technique is safe in older children, caution should be taken in younger children who appear to be more likely to vomit the residual bumper. LEVELS OF EVIDENCE: Level III-Treatment study, Retrospective comparative study.

publication date

  • May 2018