Neurostimulation Therapy for Non-neurogenic Overactive Bladder in Children: A Meta-analysis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of neurostimulation for non-neurogenic overactive bladder in children, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed on August 2016. RCTs were evaluated according to the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias assessment. Number of patients with post-treatment partial response (PR) (50%-89%), complete response (CR) (≥90%), and full response (FR) (100%) were extracted for relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Effect estimates were pooled using the Mantel-Haenszel method with random effect model if significant inter-study heterogeneity (P <.1) was noted. Subgroup analysis was performed according to each treatment setting (PROSPERO CRD42016043502). RESULTS: Five eligible studies (245 patients) were included. Overall effect estimates showed that compared with standard urotherapy, neurostimulation demonstrated significantly better ≥50% (PR + CR + FR) response (RR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.2), but not ≥90% (CR + FR) response (RR = 8.28, 95% CI 0.65-105.92). Clinic-based neurostimulation had significantly better treatment outcomes for both ≥50% (PR + CR + FR) and ≥90% (CR + FR) responses (RR = 3.24, 95% CI 1.89-5.57; RR = 20.81, 95% CI 2.97-145.59, respectively), whereas a self-administered regimen showed no differences for both ≥50% (PR + CR + FR) and ≥90% (CR + FR) response rates between treatment groups (RR = 2.61, 95% CI 0.48-14.15; RR = 3.55, 95% CI 0.19-67.82, respectively). No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: Neurostimulation therapy may lead to better partial improvement of non-neurogenic overactive bladder; however, it may not render a definitive complete response. Office-based neurostimulation seems more efficacious than self-administered neurostimulation. Further RCTs are needed to compare outcomes of the 2 regimens.

authors

  • Fernandez, Nicolas
  • Chua, Michael E
  • Ming, Jessica M
  • Silangcruz, Jan Michael
  • Zu'bi, Fadi
  • Dos Santos, Joana
  • Lorenzo, Armando J
  • Braga, Luis
  • Lopes, Roberto Iglesias

publication date

  • December 2017