Acute plasma volume expansion alters cardiovascular but not thermal function during moderate intensity prolonged exercise Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • To investigate the hypothesis that the increase in plasma volume (PV) that typically occurs with training results in improved cardiovascular and thermal regulation during prolonged exercise, eight untrained males (V(O2)peak = 3.52 +/- 0.12 L x min(-1)) performed 90 min of cycle ergometry at 62% V(O2)peak before and after acute PV expansion. Subjects were infused with a PV-expanding solution (dextran (6%) or Pentaspan (10%)) equivalent to 6.7 mL x kg(-1) body mass (PVX) or acted as their own control (CON) in a randomized order. PVX resulted in a calculated 15.8% increase in resting PV, which relative to CON, was maintained throughout the exercise (P < 0.05). During PVX, heart rate was lower (P < 0.05) and stroke volume and cardiac output were higher (P < 0.05) during the exercise. Mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance, although altered by exercise (P < 0.05), were not different between the two conditions. Core temperature, which was progressively increased by the exercise (P < 0.01), was not affected by PVX. A similar decrease in body weight was observed between the conditions as a result of the exercise (P < 0.01). These results indicate that acute PVX alters cardiovascular performance without affecting the thermoregulatory response to prolonged cycle exercise.

publication date

  • March 2000