Development and Evaluation of Global Child Health Educational Modules Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: To determine if a standardized global child health (GCH) modular course for pediatric residents leads to satisfaction, learning, and behavior change. METHODS: Four 1-hour interactive GCH modules were developed addressing priority GCH topics. "Site champions" from 4 Canadian institutions delivered modules to pediatric residents from their respective programs during academic half-days. A pre-post, mixed methods evaluation incorporated satisfaction surveys, multiple-choice knowledge tests, and focus group discussions involving residents and satisfaction surveys from program directors. RESULTS: A total of 125 trainees participated in ≥1 module. Satisfaction levels were high. Focus group participants reported high satisfaction with the concepts taught and the dynamic, participatory approach used, which incorporated multimedia resources. Mean scores on knowledge tests increased significantly postintervention for 3 of the 4 modules (P < .001), and residents cited increases in their practical knowledge, global health awareness, and motivation to learn about global health. Program directors unanimously agreed that the modules were relevant, interesting, and could be integrated within existing formal training time. CONCLUSIONS: A relatively short, participatory, foundational GCH modular curriculum facilitated knowledge acquisition and attitude change. It could be scaled up and serve as a model for other standardized North American curricula.

publication date

  • December 1, 2013