Short-term remote ischemic preconditioning is not associated with improved blood pressure and exercise capacity in young adults. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We sought to determine whether a 9-day remote ischemic preconditioning (IPC) causes improvements in exercise performance, energetics, and blood pressure. Ten participants (mean age 24 ± 4 years) had no changes in aerobic capacity (preintervention: 38 ± 10 mL/(kg·min)(-1) vs. postintervention: 38 ± 10 mL/(kg·min)(-1)), blood pressure (preintervention: 112 ± 7/66 ± 6 mm Hg vs. postintervention: 112 ± 10/62 ± 5 mm Hg), cardiac phosphocreatinine-to-adenosine-triphosphate ratio (preintervention: 2.1 ± 0.5 vs. postintervention: 2.3 ± 0.4), and postexercise skeletal muscle phosphocreatine recovery (preintervention: 34 ± 11 s vs. postintervention: 31 ± 11 s). Short-term remote IPC may be ineffective in improving these outcomes.

authors

  • Banks, Laura
  • Wells, Greg
  • Clarizia, Nadia A
  • Jean-St-Michel, Emilie
  • McKillop, Adam L
  • Redington, Andrew N
  • McCrindle, Brian W

publication date

  • August 2016

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