The Economic Well-Being of Older Women Who Become Divorced or Separated in Mid- or Later Life Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • ABSTRACTThis paper examines the economic well-being of women who become divorced or separated in mid- or later life, using 1994 data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Economic well-being is measured by adjusted economic family total money income, before-tax low-income cut-offs, and ownership of dwelling. Women and men aged 65 and over still in their first marriages are compared with women and men, aged 65 and over, who were divorced or separated at age 45 or older. Results show that women who become divorced or separated in mid- or later life are more likely to have low income than married persons and men who become divorced or separated in mid- or later life. Persons who divorce or separate in mid- or later life are less likely than married persons to live in a dwelling that is owned by a member of the household. Regression analyses show that receiving pension income and receiving earnings are positively associated with income for women who become divorced or separated in mid- or later life. Implications for the Canadian legal and retirement income systems are discussed.

publication date

  • 2002