Undergraduate Dermatology Education in Canada: A National Survey Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Background: Canadian dermatology curriculum was reviewed in 1983, 1987, 1996, and 2008. All these surveys highlighted the disproportionately low level of dermatology teaching in relation to the significant amount of skin disease seen by physicians. Since the official adoption and dissemination of the Canadian Professors of Dermatology (CPD) core curriculum and competencies, there has been no assessment of how these changes have influenced dermatology curriculum. Objective: This survey gathered information on the current status of undergraduate dermatology education across Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey was sent electronically to all undergraduate dermatology directors at each of the 17 Canadian medical schools. Results: Between 2008 and 2017, dermatology teaching has increased 25% to 25.6 ± 17.2 hours of teaching. However, 75% of this teaching is delivered in preclinical years. The number of faculty members, both dermatologists and nondermatologists, has also increased. A growing number of schools are now using electronic formats of teaching. Most schools (59%) are covering all the CPD core curriculum topics. Conclusion: Dermatology education is demonstrating positive trends with regards to teaching hours and faculty members. Nevertheless, a more even distribution of content so that students have increased clinical exposure should be achieved. Furthermore, an online atlas of resources would be helpful in standardising curriculum.

publication date

  • January 2018