Functional Impairment in Patients with Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Introduction:We conducted a retrospective chart review of 53 patients diagnosed with sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis (sIBM) who have been followed at the McMaster Neuromuscular Clinic since 1996.Objectives:We reviewed patient medical histories in order to compare our findings with similar cohorts, and analyzed quantitative strength data to determine functionality in guiding decisions related to gait assistive devices.Methods:Patient information was acquired through retrospective clinic chart review.Results:Our study found knee extension strength decreased significantly as patients transitioned to using more supportive gait assistive devices (P < 0.05). A decline to below 30 Nm was particularly indicative of the need for a preliminary device (i.e. cane)(P < 0.05). Falls and fear of falling poses a significant threat to patient physical well-being. The prevalence of dysphagia increased as patients required more supportive gait devices, and finally a significant negative correlation was found between time after onset and creatine kinase (CK) levels (P < 0.01).Conclusion:This study supports that knee extension strength may be a useful tool in advising patients concerning ambulatory assistance. Further investigations concerning gait assistive device use and patient history of falling would be beneficial in preventing future falls and improving long-term patient outcomes.

publication date

  • March 2014

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