Individual and Neighborhood Characteristics Associated with Environmental Exposure Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Environmental exposure research tends to emphasize the monitoring and regulation of emissions, with fewer investigations of exposure experienced in the general population. To help bridge the gap between environmental quality and perceived exposure, this study examines ambient exposures among 300 residents from each of 4 neighborhoods and among a control group of 300 residents in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Logistic regression analyses determined how individual, neighborhood, and housing characteristics influenced self-reported exposure in the workplace, inside the home, and around the home. Blue-collar occupations, neighborhood dislikes, and a home in disrepair were associated with work exposure. Neighborhood dislikes, renting, and indicating how the neighborhood could be healthier were associated with indoor exposure. Pesticide exposure was linked to professional occupations and to a specific neighborhood. Older homes were also associated with pesticide and indoor exposure. The findings highlight the need for further research on indoor exposure indices and on perceptions of neighborhood quality.

publication date

  • July 2005