Complementary uses of small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Most proteins function within networks and, therefore, protein interactions are central to protein function. Although stable macromolecular machines have been extensively studied, dynamic protein interactions remain poorly understood. Small-angle X-ray scattering probes the size, shape and dynamics of proteins in solution at low resolution and can be used to study samples in a large range of molecular weights. Therefore, it has emerged as a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems and bridge fragmented information obtained using high-resolution techniques. Here we review how small-angle X-ray scattering can be combined with other structural biology techniques to study protein dynamics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman.

publication date

  • November 2017