The influence of augmented feedback and prior learning on the acquisition of a new bimanual coordination pattern Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The present research examined two variables regarding the acquisition of a new bimanual coordination pattern: the role of previous experience and the nature of augmented feedback. Two groups of participants acquired a new coordination pattern (135 degrees relative phase) following two sessions of practice of another novel pattern (90 degrees relative phase). Transfer of learning in these groups was compared to two groups that had not previously learned a new pattern, but were nevertheless influenced by coordination patterns that are intrinsic to the task of bimanual relative timing (in-phase, 0 degrees, and anti-phase, 180 degrees). The findings revealed that new learning overshadowed the influence of the intrinsic patterns. Learning was also greatly affected by augmented feedback: dynamic, on-line pursuit tracking information was more effective in transfer than static, terminal feedback. Implications of these findings regarding theoretical constructs in motor learning are discussed.

publication date

  • June 2006