Application of DNA fingerprinting to enforcement of hunting regulations in Ontario. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • DNA fingerprinting has been used in investigations of 40 cases of infractions of hunting regulations involving white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and moose (Alces alces) in Ontario. In most of these cases, individual-specific DNA fingerprints obtained with the Jeffrey's 33.15 multilocus probe were used to link the animal remains found at the illegal kill site to blood and tissue samples of the dead animal associated with a suspect. DNA fingerprints from 27 white-tailed deer and 19 moose were obtained in order to establish the level of band-sharing in DNA fingerprints among unrelated individuals in each species. We also determined the levels of band-sharing among animals from the same region and calculated the probability of two individuals sharing the same DNA fingerprint. Details are presented from cases in which the evidence was presented and accepted by Ontario courts.

publication date

  • January 1993