Validity of field assessments to predict peak muscle power in preschoolers Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Field-based fitness assessments are time- and cost-efficient. However, no studies to date have reported the predictive value of field-based musculoskeletal fitness assessments in preschoolers. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of 2 field assessments to predict peak muscle power in preschool-aged children. Four-hundred and nineteen 3- to 5-year olds participated (208 girls, 211 boys; mean age: 4.5 ± 0.9 years). Peak power (PP) was evaluated using a modified 10-s Wingate protocol as the criterion standard. Standing long-jump was measured in inches to the back of the heel using a 2-footed takeoff and landing. Shuttle-run time was measured using a shuttle-run protocol, which required children to sprint 50 feet (15.2 m), pick up a small block, and sprint back, with time measured to the closest tenth of a second. Regression modelling was used to calculate the predictive power of each field-based measurement, adjusting for weight (kg), age, and sex. Both standing long-jump distance and shuttle-run time were significantly correlated with PP (r = 0.636, p < 0.001, and r = -0.684, p < 0.001, respectively). Linear regression analysis determined that a child's PP can be predicted from the child's weight, age, and sex and either standing long-jump or shuttle-run time (adjusted R2 = 0.79, p < 0.001, and 0.81, p < 0.001, respectively). The standing long-jump and the Bruininks Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2nd Edition shuttle-run are both significant predictors of peak muscle power in preschool children. Either measure can be used as a cost- and time-efficient estimate of musculoskeletal fitness in preschoolers.

publication date

  • August 2017